A Scorpion Is Changing Childhood Cancer

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Science is so cool! Really, it’s the scientists that are amazing – who takes a look at a scorpion and thinks, “I bet I can do something with that venom”? I’m sure it doesn’t happen in exactly that way, but still…

Scientists at Fred Hutchison Cancer Research Center did just that. By linking a peptide (mini-protein) from the Israeli deathstalker scorpion to a “molecular flashlight,” they created the first Tumor Paint and in 2007. This “paint” clearly distinguishes the cancer tissues from normal tissue, and in the world of brain surgery, it’s a game changer.

Why it matters

This video tells the story in a way that words can’t. Please take 3 minutes and watch it.

 

Sara Stamp

Sara Stamp

Layla’s Legacy Foundation is a 501(c)(3) organization funding innovative pediatric brain cancer research while bringing hope and help to families impacted by the disease.

Our Story

In October 2016, the Stamp family was devastated by the news that their 4-year-old daughter, Layla, had a form of pediatric brain cancer called Medulloblastoma. Even after surgery, months of chemotherapy and radiation, Layla’s cancer returned. For 14 months the family fought and tried every possible treatment available only to lose Layla on November 11, 2017, shortly after her 5th birthday.
 
During their journey, the Stamps learned just how little funding there was for pediatric cancers and also how difficult it can be for families financially. Layla’s Legacy was founded to create change in research, to be advocates of the disease and to help support families by offsetting costs where needed. In their mind, it was time to Do More for our kids.

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